2008/2009 Grants Funded

July 26th, 2012   Add Comment

Vestibular Testing $40,000 Development of Cell-Based Therapies for Usher syndrome $52,000 Building a Foundation for Clinical Trials in Usher syndrome $60,000 Visual Field Modeling, Analysis, and Development of Outcome Measures for Treatment Trials in Usher syndrome $50,000

Development of Improved Visual Field Testing

July 26th, 2012   Add Comment

Development of Improved Visual Field Testing as an Outcome Measure for Treatment Trials in Usher Syndrome (funded January 2007) Grant Summary Usher syndrome is a genetic condition causing both hearing loss and vision loss, and is the most common cause of deaf-blindness in the Western world.  Some individuals with Usher syndrome have moderate hearing loss, where others are born totally deaf.  With the advent and increasing availability of the cochlear implant, the hearing loss in Usher syndrome can be managed and even, in many cases,…
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Development of Methods of Usher Syndrome Gene Therapy

July 26th, 2012   Add Comment

Development of Methods of Usher Syndrome Gene Therapy (funded January 2007) Grant Summary Usher syndrome is the commonest inherited cause of combined blindness and deafness.  The progressive vision loss is currently untreatable, although some hearing may be restored with cochlear implants.  Several gene mutations have been identified as causes of the disease, including mutations in the usherin, harmonin and myosin VIIa genes.  Gene therapy is a promising experimental treatment that has the potential to prevent the loss of hearing and sight in this devastating condition,…
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Population Genetic Studies of Usher Syndrome

July 26th, 2012   Add Comment

Pilot Project of Population Genetic Studies of Usher Syndrome (funded January 2006) Grant Summary: The research is being conducted at the Oregon School of the Deaf in Salem, Oregon by Dr. William Kimberling from Boystown University. The goal of this study is to determine the frequencies of known Usher syndrome subtypes and their mutations in a deaf school population and in students with varied hearing losses in special education classes. This project is nearing completion and we received a synopsis of the study from the…
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